Redemption by Propitiation

How did Christ redeem us?  What does it mean that Jesus is our propitiation?  More of those big words (as we discussed in the last few posts) that is so important to the gospel.  Because of our sin, because of God’s righteousness and justice, the penalty needs to be paid, a sacrifice.  God the Father provided that through His Son, Jesus Christ.  Jesus is “a propitiation by His blood” We are redeemed through Him.  So what exactly do these words mean? Continue reading “Redemption by Propitiation”

Sin, Righteousness, Justification

In the previous post, we went through Romans 3:23-25 and discussed some of the words (grace and faith) used that are critical to the gospel and to explain their meaning.  Here we will look at some others that are not very common in today’s vocabulary: sin, righteousness and justification. Continue reading “Sin, Righteousness, Justification”

What’s that mean?

Ever notice that Christians have these fancy terms that few if any other people use?  And some of the words may have a different meaning in scripture than how the average Joe would use it (like faith).  Some of these terms are critical to the gospel message.  I tried to make sense of it all and I hope I can explain in a way that is easy for all of us to understand.  As I studied these, it was quite interesting to see how these words are used in the Greek and throughout the scriptures.  I don’t know Greek, but googling the Strong’s definitions of the Greek/Hebrew terms and looking at the context in the Bible has helped quite a bit.  We will discuss some of these terms in the next few posts.  Let’s begin with the scripture that is the heart of the gospel message and incorporates most of these terms.  I hope you read on and that God blesses you and gives you and me more insight. Continue reading “What’s that mean?”

Be Sanctified

What does it mean to be sanctified?  Sanctification is one of those big words mostly used in Christian circles.  What exactly does it mean?  Is it something we are given? Something we have to do? Do we obtain it when we receive salvation or is it a process?  This is a discussion that I have heard recently with conflicting answers so I thought I would look into it.  In the old testament, it is used to mean “to make holy or set apart.”  It usually was something God decided to do for His people, an individual or His temple.  It was something He declared.  So what does it mean for believers?

I looked up the Greek term using e-sword (www.e-sword.net) to learn what the Greek terms are and what they mean.  From what I gathered, there are a couple different words and different uses (I found a few in particular:  hagaismos,  hagios, and hagiazo).  I am no scholar or anything near to that, but they seem to be derivatives of the same word.  They basically mean “sanctification, consecration, purification.”  To purify, make holy, set apart (for God’s glory  or to do His work).  It is the process of making or becoming holy.  Clear as mud, right?  Let’s look at the New Testament scriptures to see how the word is used. Continue reading “Be Sanctified”

Guilt and Forgiveness

In some ways guilt and forgiveness go hand in hand, but in other ways they are completely opposite.  Without guilt there is no need for forgiveness.  Forgiveness is more about the forgiver showing mercy.  We can all receive forgiveness if we just believe and trust in Jesus Christ…and we all need it.  In my last post, we talked about how we should forgive, knowing that we have been forgiven too.  Jesus not only took our sins away, but He also took away our guilt.  Knowing this, we should e able to not only forgive others, but also forgive ourselves. Continue reading “Guilt and Forgiveness”